What it is…

Cooperative Education is a method of instruction that blends school and workplace learning, and is most often tied to career and technical education.  Workplace learning is defined as experiential activities that engage the student in learning and prepare young people for the world of work. Through the assistance of the Cooperative Education Coordinator, students are assigned to an approved worksite. At the worksite, students work directly with a supervisor or a mentor over a semester, to observe, assist, and accomplish work tasks.  Cooperative education students usually progress from observing and performing simple tasks to performing tasks requiring more responsibility and more complex skills.  Students receive academic credit for their work.   “Co-op is more than a part-time job; it is an extension of classroom learning”

Students receive…

• Extensive instruction in personal finance through Financial Peace University • Continued instruction and support from program instructors to improve their career and technical skills • Career Counseling services

Benefits to students…

• Opportunity to allow students to apply what they learned in the classroom to the job  • Enhance classroom instruction by providing practical work experience that is relevant to students’ career goals • Gain direct knowledge about the workplace • Learn more about what kinds of occupations they like and dislike • Opportunity for potential full-time employment after high school graduation

Benefits to employers…

• Expanding a well-prepared labor pool • Recruiting and training future employees • Meeting current labor shortages • Cultivating business opportunities with schools • Fostering a positive public image • Screening of trainees • Training programs with curricula geared to their specific employment area • A motivated source of temporary or seasonal employees

Criteria for student participation…

• No more than 10 absences in the previous semester at the career center.  If a student is absent more than 10 days, that student will be up for review by the instructor and the cooperative education coordinator to determine if and when the student will be eligible for co-op. • Student must maintain a grade point average in their shop that is determined by the program instructor. • The program instructor must recommend student for co-op placement. • Student must meet academic requirements set by sending school.

Testimonials….

Riley Wingert – Co-op Student employed at Olson & Olson – “The Co-op program has allowed me to see the manufacturing process and has affirmed my decision to pursue engineering.”

Darren Holtry – FCCTC Graduate 2010 – “In my opinion, every student should co-op during their senior year.  The hands on learning and skills help bring it all together.  I am currently working to pay my way through college with the skills I learned at the Career Center.”